How Will We Regulate the Connected Vehicle?

How Will We Regulate the Connected Vehicle?

Here is a taste of my newest RTInsights article on regulation and the connected vehicle. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/power-at-the-edge-how-electric-cars-will-fill-up-on-the-fly/.

While connected and autonomous vehicles will dominate our roadways in the coming years, how will we regulate around these new technologies?

No technology is born in a vacuum, and neither are regulations. When the car was originally created, we did not have a system of signs, traffic lights, traffic police, nor driver’s education. The United States saw its 200,000 strong population of cars in 1909 balloon into 2.25 million in 1916. At the same time, cars shared the roads with pedestrians, and as a result, there were many unnecessary “catastrophes” (or what we now call “accidents”) and public rejection of the automobile.

The modern traffic management system was built slowly over time. Briefly, vehicles were limited to 5 miles per hour so they would not spook horses. There was a time policemen were asked to regulate all traffic instead of having people just know who had the right of way. Eventually, we hit upon the current system: require everyone to learn the traffic regulations before they are allowed to drive and install signs.

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Power at the Edge: How Electric Cars Will Fill Up on the Fly

Power at the Edge: How Electric Cars Will Fill Up on the Fly

Here is a taste of my newest RTInsights article on how the cars of the future could be charged without a gas or charging station. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/power-at-the-edge-how-electric-cars-will-fill-up-on-the-fly/.

New technologies bringing more autonomous and connected vehicles into production will see more electric cars on our roads. How will they stay charged up?

In the past, cars ran on coal, wood, and alcohol and there were no fueling stations. American carmakers experimented with coal-run vehicles in the 1970s. Many vehicles were converted to use firewoodinstead of gas during the Second World War due to the rationing of fossil fuels — in fact, there was a network of firewood-stocking stations for just this purpose. The Ford Model T was designed to run on bioethanol, but most Model Ts ran on oil-derived petroleum due to the U.S. alcohol prohibition and cheap oil prices.

Today, most cars are fueled at gas stations, and to a lesser extent, electric charging stations on the road and in parking lots or at home. Electric cars suffer two problems: a charge does not last long in terms of mileage and it takes a long time to charge an electric vehicle. These two problems — range anxiety and charge time anxiety —  could harm the electric vehicle project. There is a range of different solutions to these problems that we should look at.

Lessons from Connected Bike-Sharing in the Internet of Cars

Lessons from Connected Bike-Sharing in the Internet of Cars

Here is a taste of my RTInsights article on what connected vehicles can learn from dockless bikesharing services. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/lessons-from-connected-bike-sharing-in-the-internet-of-cars/.

Vehicle-sharing services, like bike-sharing, will grow due to the rise of smartphones, possibly becoming the main form of travel in the autonomous future.

Nothing screams “world of the future” more than a large industrial machine that is summoned by a smartphone to go for a ride. In the whole discussion about the end of the ownership economy, we forget we have had vehicle-sharing services as far back as 1948.

Rental services such as Avis and Europcar can be found in places such as Heathrow Airport in England and Puerto Varas in Chile to give tourists and locals a way to travel between business meetings or grab groceries. In recent years car subscription services such as Zipcar allow customers to rent vehicles for as little time as an hour with 30 minutes advance notice.

Is the Connected Vehicle Market’s Future Shifting Towards B2B?

Is the Connected Vehicle Market’s Future Shifting Towards B2B?

Here is a taste of my newest RTInsights article on how the rise of the connected vehicles is changing existing business models. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/is-the-connected-vehicle-markets-future-shifting-towards-b2b/.

The connected vehicle is tearing up decades-old business models in the car industry. From ridesharing to on-demand mobility, the innovation won’t stop soon.

The connected vehicle is already changing the automotive market as we know it. 25% of American millennials do not have driver licenses and many people are using services such as Lyft and Didi instead of driving their own vehicles. This trend may mean car manufacturers (OEM) such as Toyota, Ford, and Hyundai will sell fewer cars.

Not all business models will change greatly; trucking companies will still need trucks, Magna International and other suppliers will still sell new parts and/or replacement parts, and some people will always buy and/or rent cars. If fewer cars are being sold, the OEMs will have to experiment with other ways to make money, such as investments in services — General Motors already has a stake in Lyft, for example — or different ways to sell their vehicles, such as leasing their vehicles directly to drivers. The vehicle industry will have to review their business models to survive in this new market

Is the Coming Autonomous Car Age the End of B2C?

Is the Coming Autonomous Car Age the End of B2C?

Here is my newest article on RTInsights. Here is a taste of my article on how the rise of the autonomous vehicles will change the business-to-consumer (B2C) market. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/is-the-coming-autonomous-car-age-the-end-of-b2c/.

This is the dawn of a new autonomous car era, where transportation-as-a-service may rule. Who will own the consumer when this happens?

The car industry is changing. The idea that people should own vehicles dates back to the earliest days of the Ford Motor Company when the autoworkers were paid well enough to be able to buy the cars they made. The arrival of ride-sharing makes it easier for urban dwellers to get rides at low cost and quickly.

This is the dawn of a new era, one where we no longer need to own our vehicles or depend on public transportation to get around. Whether this is a passing thought or the beginning of a disruption of a market is up for debate, and we need to discuss it. Now that a quarter of U.S. millennials do not have driving licenses, we need to talk about how a populace less interested in vehicle ownership will impact the automotive industry.

How Solar Power Can Energize Our Infrastructure

How Solar Power Can Energize Our Infrastructure

Here is my newest article on RTInsights. Here is a taste of my article on how we can create add solar panels to our infrastructure to generate more energy. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/how-solar-power-can-energize-our-infrastructure/.

Technology now gives us the opportunity to drastically increase energy production without having to overhaul our entire energy infrastructure.

Last week, I wrote about how the connected vehicle can integrate with solar energy to push the world of energy further. We can use solar vehicles to generate energy, transport energy through batteries and integrate them into the energy grid.

We can go further by integrating the transportation infrastructure itself into the energy grid. The car’s surface area is relatively limited compared to roads, walls and rest stops. Infrastructure is ample and stationary, which makes it easier to angle solar panels toward the sun.

Here is my newest article on RTInsights. Here is a taste of my article on how we can create solar vehicles that can generate and distribute energy and make something special in the Internet of Cars. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/how-connected-vehicles-can-produce-energy/.

We tend to think of the connected car as consumers of energy, but they can also be electricity generators and containers.

Something strange has happened: Solar power is relatively cheap even though oil prices have remained relatively low at less than $63/barrel since 2015.

Green energy is all the rage, as traditional third world countries such as Chile are investing in wind, solar, and geothermal power and Tesla is contributing to the re-electrification of Puerto Rico. What does all this have to do with connected vehicles? We tend to think of the connected vehicle as a consumer of energy, but connected vehicles can be so much more than that. They can also be electricity generators and containers. We need to rethink how we treat the car in terms of energy.