Connectivity East: The Elephant or The Tiger in India?

Connectivity East: The Elephant or The Tiger in India?

Here is a taste of my article on the future of the connected vehicle market and self-driving vehicles in India. You can find a taste of the article below and the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/connectivity-east-the-elephant-or-the-tiger-in-india/.

While job losses from self-driving cars are a concern in India, its complex driving environment may have more to do with a slow rollout of driverless tech.

While India is the sixth largest car manufacturer in the world, a top-six car-buyer market globally, and is also a technology powerhouse, one can be forgiven for thinking driverless vehicles in India makes little economic sense. The Indian Minister for Road Transport and Highways Nitin Gadkari declared that “We won’t allow driverless cars in India” because he believes they will take away jobs. The average pay of an Indian taxi driver is ₹14,267 ($208.87) per month and the light detection and ranging or LIDAR necessary for an autonomous automotive to work cost somewhere between $12,000-75,000.

A bigger obstacle to Indian automation is the Indian driving environment. Many Indian road signs are absent, falling off, or not visible, families are known to live almost on top of the highways, and there is no lane discipline. If we do not have the technology for cars to properly drive in Berlin or Boston within the next five years, how can it work in Bengaluru? As University of Michigan dean of engineering Alec Gallimore put it, the technology can work in India, but only as long as “we’re not copy-and-pasting from the West.” India, like major Asian economic rivals in the autonomous race, is making strides of its own.

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Could the UK Benefit From Becoming AI’s Moral Center?

Could the UK Benefit From Becoming AI’s Moral Center?

Now for something very different. I recently attended an event at the British Consulate in Boston regarding the British approach to artificial intelligence strategy and wrote up my analysis of it for Real-Time Insights. You can find a taste of the article below and the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/could-the-uk-benefit-from-becoming-ais-moral-center/.

While countries are trying to come up with an AI strategy, not all can lead in all areas of this new tech. Could the UK try to become AI’s moral heart?

The British consulate in Boston recently invited me to attend an event to discuss their country’s approach to artificial intelligence (AI) strategy. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK) wants to improve its business relationship with the United States by establishing a reputation in AI.

Britain is no longer the “Workshop of the World” of the early 1800s, when it manufactured goods that beat its competitors in terms of price, quantity, and quality. Now it wants to regain its position as a leader in technology. The UK aims to be the new world center of AI, but it has a long way to go.

Data Ownership in the Age of the Connected Vehicle

Data Ownership in the Age of the Connected Vehicle

Here is a taste of my newest RTInsights article on connected vehicle data ownership. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/data-ownership-in-the-age-of-the-connected-vehicle/.

The issue of data ownership in the coming generations of connected vehicles will be thorny. Owners, drivers, OEMs, insurers, and others may have claims.

Most people do not know what data reside and are generated by vehicles. In fact about  90% of Europeans think the drivers own the data in their vehicles and some American lawyers believe there are legal arguments in favor of having the vehicles’ owners keep the data held within their cars.

In the current landscape, most of the drivers’ vehicles’ data are owned by the car manufacturers (OEMs) in the United States and Europe, not the vehicles’ owners. People are becoming aware of the data issues involved in cases such as the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Tempe’s Self-Driving Accident: Should Performance Data Be Shared?

Tempe’s Self-Driving Accident: Should Performance Data Be Shared?

Here is a taste of my newest RTInsights article on self-driving vehicle testing in the aftermath of the Uber crash in Tempe and whether companies should share data to prevent such an incident from reoccurring. You can find the full article at https://www.rtinsights.com/tempes-self-driving-accident-should-performance-data-be-shared/.

The recent Uber self-driving vehicle accident that killed a woman in Arizona shows the technology may not be ready for prime time yet, but should all players in the market should be sharing use data?

There have been dozens of articles about who is to blame in the Uber crash involving a pedestrian walking her bicycle and an autonomous Uber car which had an emergency backup driver who would take over when the car made a mistake.

What went wrong? Did the program “see” the bicycle and assume the pedestrian was riding the bicycle more quickly than she was actually moving her bicycle? If the driver was paying more attention, would she have spotted the bicycle in time? While we should mourn the people lost due to immature technology, we should take comfort in that we have information and have the opportunity to add the information to vehicular programs so this will never happen again.

Connectivity East: China’s “People’s Republic” of Automation

Connectivity East: China’s “People’s Republic” of Automation

Here are the first few paragraphs from my RTInsights article on the future of transportation in China.

Connected car technology is most often associated with countries such as Germany and Japan, but what happens when China wants in?

Connected car technology is most often associated with countries such as Germany and Japan, but what happens when a country does not fit this model?  Is there a country with technology firms that may be little known outside Asia but are some of the biggest in the world? A country that is economically poorer per capita than other markets such as France and Korea but will greatly influence them with the largest car market in the world? There is one such country, and that country is the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Anyone who ignores the Middle Kingdom is likely to misunderstand how the future will unfold.

The Chinese automobile industry looks very different from most other national industries. After decades of lagging behind, China now makes more cars than any other country in the world. In 2015 the PRC produced 24,503,326 cars, far more than America’s 12 million vehicles (only a third of which are passenger cars). However, it does not yet have any major car manufacturers (OEMs) that resemble major OEMs such as Citroën and Tata Motors or juggernauts such as Toyota, Ford, or Daimler. There are more than 100 licensed OEMs in the People’s Republic. Six of the largest are state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and many others are also bolstered by the provinces and cities that are eager to become new centers of car manufacturing.

Connectivity East: Riding Along in Japan’s Land of the Rising Sun

Connectivity East: Riding Along in Japan’s Land of the Rising Sun

Here are the first few paragraphs from my latest RTInsights article on the future of transportation. In my most recent article I write about Japan’s approach to the connected vehicle and how they are tying their developments to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

 

With some of the world’s most innovative automakers based there, Japan is hard at work on the connected car and is tying developments to the 2020 Olympics.

The rise of the connected vehicle is not an exclusively American phenomenon. As shown in my previous article, it is a global industry that is rising across the world, and this is just as true for South Korea, the host of the 2018 Winter Olympic Games, as it is for Japan, the host of the 2020 Olympic Summer Games. Americans generally associate Google and Tesla with the rise of connected vehicles when the truth is that Toyota, Nissan, and Honda have been quietly leading the field with the support of the Japanese government.

The Japanese government is interested in facilitating the rise of the Autonomous Japanese Vehicle. In July 2017, the National Police Agency created adoption standards for testing driverless vehicles on public roads. Companies can test their vehicles as long as they meet safety standards, such as installing systems that force the vehicle to stop automatically in case of an emergency and requiring all such tests to be done on roads where radio communications are always available.

Connectivity East: The Connected Car Has an Olympic Moment

Connectivity East: The Connected Car Has an Olympic Moment

In this article I write about how South Korea used the Winter Olympics to showcase its advances in the world of autonomous vehicles.

The PyeongChang Winter Olympics gave South Korea a chance to showcase their own connected car developments and its growing tech ecosystem.

In the United States, there is a lot of attention paid to the progress being made by large firms such as Google and Ford and new players and start-ups such as Uber. Many Americans forget two things: first, many firms are involved in the Internet of Cars outside of the traditional transportation and technology firms, such as Qualcomm, and second, the United States is not the only country driving the technology forward.

Most of the foreign major car manufacturers, from Volkswagen to Toyota, are involved in the rise of the connected vehicle as well as newer firms such as the Israeli firm Mobileye. In this article, we will see how the Republic of Korea is taking the opportunity to showcase some of its connected vehicle technology in the winter Olympics.